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Library Media & Information Literacy Standards & Best Practices

Library Media Standards

Kindergarten
K001 Memorize and recite familiar nursery rhymes and poems. *
K002 Listen to fiction and non-fiction to demonstrate understanding. *
K003 Self-select and independently "read" fiction and non-fiction materials. * (decode story through illustrations)
K004 Formulate a basic question about an information topic.
K005 Be familiar with the following terms: title, author, illustrator, cover, spine, pages.
K006 Exhibit appropriate library media center behavior including proper care of materials, equipment, and facility.
K007 Demonstrate proper checkout procedures, and return books in a responsible manner.
K008 Recognize that people come from different cultural backgrounds. ***

1st Grade
1001 Know the location of easy, fiction, and non-fiction books in the library media center.
1002 Explain proper arrangement of easy books.
1003 Self-select and independently read fiction and non-fiction materials. *
1004 Identify and use simple information resources to answer an information question.
1005 Summarize a story using literary elements: character, setting, problem, resolution. *
1006 Distinguish the difference between fiction and non-fiction materials.
1007 Explore likenesses and differences of various cultures and customs. ***
 
2nd Grade
2001 Recognize when information is needed and develop appropriate questions to guide research.
2002 Know the arrangement of information within sources and be able to locate information effectively. (parts of a book, alphabetical order)
2003 Self-select and independently read fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. *
2004 Use appropriate resource materials to locate information. *
2005 Create a project that communicates information gathered from research.
2006 Identify literary awards (Caldecott, Golden Sower, etc.)
2007 Demonstrate an understanding of cultural heritages and identify contributions. ***
 
3rd Grade
3001 Develop appropriate questions to guide research.
3002 Locate and select materials using the computer catalog.
3003 Self-select and independently read fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. *
3004 Use appropriate resource materials to locate information. *
3005 Create a project that communicates information gathered from research.
3006 Recognize award-winning literature, e.g. Golden Sower, Caldecott, Coretta Scott King awards.
3007 Summarize fiction and non-fiction selections in writing. *
3008 Identify significant contributions minorities have made to the community. ***
 
4th Grade
4001 Develop appropriate questions to guide research, and identify the appropriate resources to answer them.
4002 Demonstrate understanding of the Dewey Decimal System by locating nonfiction materials according to call number.
4003 Self-select and independently read fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. *
4004 Use appropriate resource materials to locate information. *
4005 Create a project with a visual that communicates information gathered from research.
4006 Use note taking, outlining, and summarizing strategies to record and present information. *
4007 Recognize and compare how people from varied backgrounds and cultures manage conflict. ***
 
5th Grade
5001 Identify information needs and select appropriate information resources.
5002 Recognize award-winning literature, e.g. Golden Sower, Coretta Scott King, and Newbery awards.
5003 Self-select and independently read fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. *
5004 Use appropriate resource materials to locate and evaluate information. *
5005 Create a report utilizing technology that communicates information gathered from research.
5006 Use note taking, outlining, and summarizing strategies to record and present information. *
5007 Identify problem solving methods to address inequities among groups of people. ***
 
6th Grade
6001 Seek information related to personal interests.
6002 Recognize award-winning literature, e.g. Golden Sower, Coretta Scott King, and Newbery awards.
6003 Self-select and independently read fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. *
6004 Use appropriate resource materials to locate and evaluate information. *
6005 Use note taking, outlining, and summarizing strategies to record and present information. *
6006 Compile bibliography/works cited list of materials used for research.
6007 Analyze how a person from one culture interacts with a different culture. ***

* Indicates the standard matches the OPS Reading/Language Arts standards.
**Indicates the standard matches the Nebraska Reading/Writing standards.
***Indicates district-adopted multicultural standards intended for use in all subject areas.

Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning & Best Practices
 Adopted by the American Association of School Librarians and the Association for Educational Communications and Technology

Information Literacy Standards
Standard 1 - The student who is information literate accesses information efficiently and effectively.
Indicators:
- Recognizes the need for information.
- Recognizes that accurate and comprehensive information is the basis for intelligent decision making.
- Formulates questions based on information needs.
- Identifies a variety of potential sources of information.
- Develops and uses successful strategies for locating information.
 
Standard 2
- The student who is information literate evaluates information critically and competently.
Indicators:
- Determines accuracy, relevance, and comprehensiveness.
- Distinguishes among facts, point of view, and opinion.
- Identifies inaccurate and misleading information.
- Selects information appropriate to the problem or question at hand.
 
Standard 3 - The student who is information literate uses information accurately and creatively.
Indicators:
- Organizes information for practical applications.
- Integrates new information into one's own knowledge.
- Applies information in critical thinking and problem solving.
- Produces and communicates information and ideas in appropriate formats.
 
Independent Learning Standards
Standard 4 - The student who is an independent learner is information literate and pursues information related to personal interests.
Indicators:
- Seeks information related to various dimensions of personal well-being, such as career interests, community involvement, health matters, and recreational pursuits.
- Designs, develops, and evaluates information products and solutions related to personal interests.
 
Standard 5 - The student who is an independent learner is information literate and appreciates literature and other creative expressions of information.
Indicators:
- Is a competent and self-motivated reader.
- Derives meaning from information presented creatively in a variety of formats.
- Develops creative products in a variety of formats.
 
Standard 6 - The student who is an independent learner is information literate and strives for excellence in information seeking and knowledge generation.
Indicators:
- Assesses the quality of the process and products of personal information seeking.
- Devises strategies for revising, improving, and updating self-generated knowledge.
 
Social Responsibility Standards
Standard 7 - The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and recognizes the importance of information to a democratic society.
Indicators:
- Seeks information from diverse sources, contexts, disciplines, and cultures.
- Respects the principle of equitable access to information.
 
Standard 8 - The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and practices ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology.
Indicators:
- Respects the principles of intellectual freedom.
- Respects intellectual property rights.
- Uses information technology responsibly.
 
Standard 9 - The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and participates effectively in groups to pursue and generate information.
Indicators:
- Shares knowledge and information with others.
- Respects others' ideas and backgrounds and acknowledges their contributions.
- Collaborates with others, both in person and through technologies, to identify information problems and to seek their solutions.
- Collaborates with others, both in person and through technologies, to design, develop, and evaluate information products and solutions.
 
Best Practices
The following instructional practices have been identified as best practices for teaching information literacy skills and language arts.
- Information literacy skills are best learned when taught within the context of classroom content. Process and content are equally important and should not be separated.
- Technology skills are best learned when integrated within the context of the classroom content.
- Library media specialists and classroom teachers are co-workers with complementary roles in planning, teaching, and evaluating.
- Students learn more when they complete assignments that are graded and have feedback from the teacher.
- Students who are actively focused and on task do best in mastering the subject matter. (classroom management)
- Direct teaching is most effective when it follows systematic steps. (lesson planning format)
- Students learn better when the relationship between past learning and/or student experiences and the new information is pointed out.
- Students who have been given some control over their learning goals and the responsibility to self-evaluate achieve at greater levels.
- Tutoring by the teacher or peers can assist students who are having difficulty with mastery.
- Cooperative learning groups that are carefully designed can help support and increase learning.
- Extensive reading of many kinds of materials, both at school and at home, results in substantial growth in vocabulary, comprehension, and knowledge.
- Active learning is far more effective than passive instruction.
- Activities such as summarizing, questioning, and interpreting contribute to improved reading comprehension.
 
Compiled from the following resources:
Cawelti, Gordon, ed. Handbook of Research on Improving Student Achievement. Arlington, VA: Educational Research Service, 1995.
Eisenberg, Michael and Robert Berkowitz. Teaching Information & Technology Skills: The Big6 in Elementary Schools. Worthington, OH: Linworth, 1999.
Langhorne, Mary Jo, ed. Developing an Information Literacy Program K-12. New York: Neal-Schuman, 1998.